The Daily Brainstorm

Let Brainstorm serve up some ideas, content, and links to fire up your synapses.

Some people are wondering whether founders of lean startups are still entrepreneurs in the conventional sense, rather than empiricists who try to find a profitable niche. Others question whether lean startups are capable of significant innovation. “Lean provides a useful toolkit, but it can bias you towards the incremental rather than the transformational,” says Scott Nolan of the Founders Fund, a venture-capital firm that makes big technology bets, such as an investment in SpaceX, a space-transport company. “You cannot simply iterate your way into orbit.”

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Good design accelerates the adoption of new ideas.

Yves Béhar

(Source: stoweboyd)

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For me, inspiration comes from a bunch of places: desperation, deadlines… A lot of times ideas will turn up when you’re doing something else. And, most of all, ideas come from confluence — they come from two things flowing together. They come, essentially, from daydreaming.

When the [social business] change message is directed at the whole organization and training is focused on individual behavior, adoption is often by a random assortment of employees rather than by cohesive units.

Dennis Pearce

  • Spend less time training individuals and more time with teams, focusing less on how and explaining more of why, encouraging teams that “get it” to work as transparently as their jobs will allow, so that others can see them as examples
  • Prioritize and communicate new features based on their ability to enhance group performance.

Social Business: Why Group Adoption Matters - InformationWeek

(via ibmsocialbiz)

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Everyone likes to think of memory as this thing that lets us vividly remember our childhoods or what we did last week. But memory is designed to help us make good decisions in the moment and, therefore, memory has to stay up-to-date. The information that is relevant right now can overwrite what was there to begin with.

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Until a year ago, I felt that I wasn’t fully able to perform my job as a kind of project leader for inspiration, because my time was not really my own. Like many people, I was hyper-scheduled, often in depressingly small chunks of time, at one meeting after another, with very little time in between. I remember one particular day when I had a different appointment or task every 10 minutes. My brain almost exploded.

Creative people thrive on serendipity, spontaneous interactions, moments of ribald humor, intense debate or just simple eye contact, and I felt as if I was losing myself. I decided that it was time to act. So I tried an experiment. I just stopped saying yes and started saying no to things.

Actually, there was a bit more method to my madness. I started a ritual that I still use today: I sit down and look at my calendar every Sunday night, pore through my coming week’s meetings and cancel a bunch of them — redundant ones where I don’t need to be “in the loop,” ones where there is an opportunity for someone else to make a decision, ones that don’t particularly inspire me, or ones where I can’t really add value. My overarching goal right now, wherever possible, is to give myself more time to simply be.

Paul Bennett, Where the Fish Swims, Ideas Fly

Two great lines:

I just stopped saying yes and started saying no to things. […] My overarching goal right now, wherever possible, is to give myself more time to simply be.

(via stoweboyd)

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fastcompany:

"It’s compassion. It’s humility. It’s saying thank you. It is always putting yourself in the other person’s position. I know it might sound weird, but empathy is one of the greatest creators of energy. It’s counterintuitive, because it’s selfless.” (!)
—Meet Angela Ahrendts, soon-to-be Apple’s Retail Chief. Her goal? Making Apple shine again.

fastcompany:

"It’s compassion. It’s humility. It’s saying thank you. It is always putting yourself in the other person’s position. I know it might sound weird, but empathy is one of the greatest creators of energy. It’s counterintuitive, because it’s selfless.” (!)

Meet Angela Ahrendts, soon-to-be Apple’s Retail Chief. Her goal? Making Apple shine again.

(via goodideaexchange)

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