The Daily Brainstorm

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Marriott Wants Moxy to Deliver the Millennial Customer, With Help From Ikea - Greg Oates

stoweboyd:

I think that hotels are a great reflection of the future workplace: they are a leading indicator of what businesses will be trying to achieve (except with less sleeping space and less drinking booze).

Here’s Greg Oates writing about Marriott’s new Moxy chain:

an excerpt

Marriott’s first Moxy Hotel opens this summer near Milan’s Malpensa airport, followed by Munich at the end of the year. Another 10 openings in Europe are slated for 2015, with 150 anticipated altogether over the next decade. Moxy was designed from the ground up for Gen X/Y based on fundamental shifts in consumer behavior within the hotel industry.

[…]

A big emphasis is placed on multi-zone lobbies that shift from quiet areas to buzzy social scenes around the lobby bar. Internal lingo at Marriott describes the separate-but-connected lobby areas as: “One end talks, one end rocks.” The bar and lounge area will feature DJs and video walls with music and social media messaging, while the quiet side is designed for intimate conversation and chilling out with your devices.

Anchoring the lobbies, the restaurant/bar concept called “The Now” will offer healthy comfort food local to the specific region. A defining characteristic with Moxy is that the restaurant/bar won’t be located “off the lobby”—it is the lobby.

Replace the bar with a cafe, and we are seeing the future workplace, like the new innovations at Square (see Another take on offices: something other than open or closed), which makes the office more like a city or an open public space, like a hotel lobby.

[Marriott’s VP of brand consulting, Indy] Adenaw is optimistic that the brand will also appeal to older generation travelers seeking the same trendy vibe and affordable rates.

“There have been very, very few competitors that we have really admired in this space,” he says. “We have visited a lot of different hotels that we thought might be close, and we have been very surprised that the average guest is clearly not just the Gen X and Gen Y traveler. You will see people in their 50s because they will respond to the attitude and the personality. We expect that to be very much a thing.”

Or 60s, in may case.

30

Work is when you confront the problems you might otherwise be tempted to run away from. Work is how you settle your financial and emotional debts—so that your travels are not an escape from your real life but a discovery of your real life.

—Rolf Potts, Vagabonding (via climbthestacks)

(via tinder)

31
futuramb:

(via #hypertextual)

This is Gary Hamel’s pyramid of human capabilities and one argument for management innovation. Tomorrow’s companies needs to be better at tapping the top three levels of the human capabilities to create the value that makes a difference.

(click on the image to read more…)

I think Gary Hamel is on the right track but I sometimes wonder if he is not underestimating the depth of the transformation we are going through. His argument seems to presuppose that there is a place (management position) from where we could stand when orchestrating this management innovation process. I doubt that is the case… I think that the positions manager are looking out from is constituting a perspective from which it is impossible to conceive what really needs be done.

futuramb:

(via #hypertextual)

This is Gary Hamel’s pyramid of human capabilities and one argument for management innovation. Tomorrow’s companies needs to be better at tapping the top three levels of the human capabilities to create the value that makes a difference.

(click on the image to read more…)

I think Gary Hamel is on the right track but I sometimes wonder if he is not underestimating the depth of the transformation we are going through. His argument seems to presuppose that there is a place (management position) from where we could stand when orchestrating this management innovation process. I doubt that is the case… I think that the positions manager are looking out from is constituting a perspective from which it is impossible to conceive what really needs be done.

54

Perseverance may be just as important as speed in the battle for the future.

—Gary Hamel 

(Source: instigation)

1

Ideas that transform industries almost never come from inside those industries.

—Gary Hamel

(Source: true-i-talk-of-dreams)

8

Gary Hamel: Training people at all levels to lead creates competitive advantage.

(Source: diverjency)

2

Today, right now, safe is risky. Listening to fear is risky. If you avoid all things that you are afraid of, you will become boring, mediocre and ignored. You will have no chance to connect, to make an impact or to do the work that matters. That’s because the only work that matters is work that’s a bit scary. And thus your best friend.

—Seth Godin
Seth Godin - GracefulGraceful
(Via Ricky C Y Hsu)

(Source: kindlequotes)

1

Management’s Grand Challenges (from Gary Hamel’s ‘Moonshots for Management)


1. Ensure that the work of management serves a higher purpose.Management, both in theory and practice, must orient itself to the achievement of noble, socially significant goals.

2. Fully embed the ideas of community and citizenship in management systems.There’s a need for processes and practices that reflect the interdependence of all stakeholder groups.

3. Reconstruct management’s philosophical foundations.To build organizations that are more than merely efficient, we will need to draw lessons from such fields as biology, political science, and theology.

4. Eliminate the pathologies of formal hierarchy. There are advantages to natural hierarchies, where power flows up from the bottom and leaders emerge instead of being appointed.

5. Reduce fear and increase trust.
Mistrust and fear are toxic to innovation and engagement and must be wrung out of tomorrow’s management systems.

6. Reinvent the means of control. To transcend the discipline-versus-freedom trade-off, control systems will have to encourage control from within rather than constraints from without.

7. Redefine the work of leadership. The notion of the leader as a heroic decision maker is untenable. Leaders must be recast as social-systems architects who enable innovation and collaboration.

8. Expand and exploit diversity. We must create a management system that values diversity, disagreement, and divergence as much as conformance, consensus, and cohesion.

9. Reinvent strategy making as an emergent process. In a turbulent world, strategy making must refl ect the biological principles of variety, selection, and retention.

10. De-structure and disaggregate the organization. To become more adaptable and innovative, large entities must be disaggregated into smaller, more malleable units.

11. Dramatically reduce the pull of the past. Existing management systems often mindlessly reinforce the status quo. In the future, they must facilitate innovation and change.

12. Share the work of setting direction. To engender commitment, the responsibility for goal setting must be distributed through a process in which share of voice is a function of insight, not power.

13. Develop holistic performance measures. Existing performance metrics must be recast, since they give inadequate attention to the critical human capabilities that drive success in the creative economy.

14. Stretch executive time frames and perspectives. We need to discover alternatives to compensation and reward systems that encourage managers to sacrifice long-term goals for short-term gains.

15. Create a democracy of information. Companies need information systems that equip every employee to act in the interests of the entire enterprise.

16. Empower the renegades and disarm the reactionaries. Management systems must give more power to employees whose emotional equity is invested in the future rather than the past.

17. Expand the scope of employee autonomy. Management systems must be redesigned to facilitate grassroots initiatives and local experimentation.

18. Create internal markets for ideas, talent, and resources. Markets are better than hierarchies at allocating resources, and companies’ resource allocation processes need to reflect this fact.

19. Depoliticize decision making. Decision processes must be free of positional biases and should exploit the collective wisdom of the entire organization and beyond.

20. Better optimize trade-offs. Management systems tend to force either-or choices. What’s needed are hybrid systems that subtly optimize key trade-offs.

21. Further unleash human imagination. Much is known about what engenders human creativity. This knowledge must be better applied in the design of management systems.

22. Enable communities of passion. To maximize employee engagement, management systems must facilitate the formation of self-defining communities of passion.

23. Retool management for an open world. Value-creating networks often transcend the firm’s boundaries and can render traditional power-based management tools ineffective. New management tools are needed for building and shaping complex ecosystems.

24. Humanize the language and practice of business. Tomorrow’s management systems must give as much credence to such timeless human ideals as beauty, justice, and community as they do to the traditional goals of efficiency, advantage, and profit.

25. Retrain managerial minds. Managers’ deductive and analytical skills must be complemented by conceptual and systems-thinking skills.

3

The only thing that can be safely predicted is that sometime soon your organization will be challenged to change in ways for which it has no precedent.

—Gary Hamel

(Source: stoweboyd)

61

The chain of command remained intact. The only difference was a psychological shift. The person performing the action now owned the action instead of carrying out an assigned task. When pushed just how far he took this “I intend” idea, Captain Marquet is quick to point out that there are only three things that he can’t delegate. “I can’t delegate my legal responsibilities, I can’t delegate my relationships and I can’t delegate my knowledge. Everything else, however, I can ask others to take responsibility for,” he says. What is so remarkable about this model and what is so important about these three responsibilities is that though they cannot be handed off, they can all be shared.

2